Media coverage on my fieldwork: impacts of land reclamation on mangroves and coastal Balinese ecosystems

Link to article: https://news.vice.com/article/indonesias-protest-generation-and-biggest-punk-band-are-fighting-land-reclamation “Kelly Heber Dunning, a doctoral candidate in natural resource management at MIT, has worked with fishing communities in the area and shares some of the same concerns. She told VICE News that intertidal habitats such as Benoa have huge value, as they “buffer human settlements from erosion, provide habitats for juvenile fish thatContinue reading “Media coverage on my fieldwork: impacts of land reclamation on mangroves and coastal Balinese ecosystems”

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Media coverage on my research: MIT Environmental Policy and Planning reviews my work on “Implementing the International Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) in South East Asia”

https://environmentalpolicyandplanning.wordpress.com/2016/12/09/implementing-the-international-convention-on-biological-diversity-cbd-in-south-east-asia/ “International treaties can exert pressure on national governments to pay attention to certain policy goals, how they choose to implement these goals is up to them. Kelly Heber Dunning (PhD ’16) examines the challenges facing countries that have signed on to the International Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD). Using a comparative case study ofContinue reading “Media coverage on my research: MIT Environmental Policy and Planning reviews my work on “Implementing the International Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) in South East Asia””

January 2015 teaching in the field: MIT Malaysia field practicum on sustainable development

This is the second year that I’ve been invited on as a teaching assistant for the MIT Sustainable Development Practicum course. We bring 15 masters students who then group themselves according to interest and study some of the many topics within sustainable development. The great thing for me is that in the final week, IContinue reading “January 2015 teaching in the field: MIT Malaysia field practicum on sustainable development”

Coastal planning for resilience: Indonesian coral reefs and community-based management

Coral reef ecosystems the world over are faced with mounting crisis. The causes range from pollution, rising ocean temperatures, to overfishing. Indonesia, home to 20% of the world’s coral reefs, 75% of the world’s existing corals, 54,700 km of coastline, 6.1 million square kilometers of EEZ, has major incentive to engage in planning for coastalContinue reading “Coastal planning for resilience: Indonesian coral reefs and community-based management”

Fiji’s slums: Environmental risk and opportunities for resilience

Over MIT’s extended winter break, I received a grant to travel to Fiji to research the informal sector, or slums, in and around Suva.  The United Nations Estimates that by 2030, 69% of Fiji’s population will live in the informal/slum housing, compared to 35% in 1970 (UN 2004).   Senior officials that I interviewed in the MinistryContinue reading “Fiji’s slums: Environmental risk and opportunities for resilience”

Destroying mangroves to create livelihoods: policy narratives versus reality

It’s no secret at this point that fish stocks are declining thanks to massive ground trawlers and other impossible technologies that strip the seas bare, coupled with toothless fisheries management regimes that set allowable catch at quantities far too high.  To make up for dwindling fisheries, aquaculture is now the new darling of multilateral donors.Continue reading “Destroying mangroves to create livelihoods: policy narratives versus reality”